• Lalibela

    Lalibela, a medieval settlement in the Lasta area of Wallo, lies at the centre of an extensive complex of rock churches. Some can be reached by one or two hours drive, others are a full day's journey

    Lalibela has 11 remarkable rock-hewn monolithic churches, believed to have been built by King Lalibela in the late 12th or early 13th Century.
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  • Gondar Castles

    Gonder was the 17th Century capital of Ethiopia, and is notable for its medieval Castles and churches.

    The City's unique imperial compound contains a number of Castles built between 1632 and 1855 by the various Emperors who reigned during this period.
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  • Tribes in Omo Valley

    The Omo valley and the surrounding areas are also well known because of their most attractive National Park and various tribes that have led traditional life styles. The famous national parks such as Nech sar, Mago and Omo are found around the Omo Valley.

    The tribes that live in the lower Omo Valley are believed to be among the most fascinating on the continent of Africa and around the world.
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  • Blue Nile,Bahir Dar

    Bahar Dar is a small town set on the south - eastern shore of Lake Tana, where local fishermen still use papyrus boats, and just 30 km from the spectacular Tissisat Falls. Here the Blue Nile creates “Smoking Water" an awe-inspiring sight as it plunges into the gorge below.

    From Bahar Dar one must explore some of the ancient monasteries that have been built around Lake Tana, or on the many Islands.
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  • The Dallol Depression

    The Dallol Depression, also called Danakil Depression, is a desert with some areas that are more than 100 meters (328 feet) below sea level. This is special because it is one of the lowest points on earth not covered by water.

    There are hot yellow sulfur fields among the sparkling white salt beds. Heat isn''t the only thing people feel in the Dallol Depression. Alarming earth tremors are frequently felt. There are also several active volcanoes
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Meskel (Finding of the True Cross)

The Maskal festival is performed on September 26 &27 every year by lighting Demera (the bonfire) which honors the memory of the bonfire of the queen and her discovery of the site of the Cross and the beginning of the excavation of the site.


Meskel, one of the major Ethiopian orthodox festivals is celebrated on 27th September and lasts for two days. Legend says that the cross upon which Christ was crucified was discovered in the year 326 by Queen Helena, mother of Constantine the Great. Unable to find the holy artifact, she set up long poles and set them on fire. Skyward raised the smoke and down it bent, touching the spot on the earth where the original cross was found buried. Queen Helen lit up torches heralding her success to the neighboring areas.

In the middle Ages, the Patriarch of Alexandria gave the Ethiopian Emperor Dawit half of the True Cross in return for the protection offered to the Coptic Christians. A fragment of the True Cross is reputed to be held at the Gishen Maryam monastery, about 70 kilometers of Dessie.

The eve of Meskel (26th of September) is called Demera. A huge bonfire is built, topped with a cross to which flowers are tied. The patriarch of the Orthodox Church leads the lightening ceremony. After the bonfire is blessed dancing and singing begins around it and an inner feeling of brightness spreads through all those around it. Little Demeras are built at individual houses and villages. The direction in which the bundle of wood collapses gives room for interpretations about the harvest, if there is going to be peace and so on. At the end of the Demera a rain shower is expected to fall to help put the fire off. If the rain falls and the fire is extinguished by it there is a belief that the year will be prosperous.

The day after Demera is Meskel. The festival is colorfully celebrated and there is plenty of food. Believers make crosses on their head with the ashes of the bonfire as a sign of devotion to the cross.The festival coincidences with the mass blooming of yellow Meskel daisies, which are a symbol of a new beginning after the rainy season.

In every major city the ceremony is celebrated colorfully, but the best place to celebrate Meskel is still the capital Addis Ababa.