• Lalibela

    Lalibela, a medieval settlement in the Lasta area of Wallo, lies at the centre of an extensive complex of rock churches. Some can be reached by one or two hours drive, others are a full day's journey

    Lalibela has 11 remarkable rock-hewn monolithic churches, believed to have been built by King Lalibela in the late 12th or early 13th Century.
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  • Gondar Castles

    Gonder was the 17th Century capital of Ethiopia, and is notable for its medieval Castles and churches.

    The City's unique imperial compound contains a number of Castles built between 1632 and 1855 by the various Emperors who reigned during this period.
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  • Tribes in Omo Valley

    The Omo valley and the surrounding areas are also well known because of their most attractive National Park and various tribes that have led traditional life styles. The famous national parks such as Nech sar, Mago and Omo are found around the Omo Valley.

    The tribes that live in the lower Omo Valley are believed to be among the most fascinating on the continent of Africa and around the world.
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  • Blue Nile,Bahir Dar

    Bahar Dar is a small town set on the south - eastern shore of Lake Tana, where local fishermen still use papyrus boats, and just 30 km from the spectacular Tissisat Falls. Here the Blue Nile creates “Smoking Water" an awe-inspiring sight as it plunges into the gorge below.

    From Bahar Dar one must explore some of the ancient monasteries that have been built around Lake Tana, or on the many Islands.
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  • The Dallol Depression

    The Dallol Depression, also called Danakil Depression, is a desert with some areas that are more than 100 meters (328 feet) below sea level. This is special because it is one of the lowest points on earth not covered by water.

    There are hot yellow sulfur fields among the sparkling white salt beds. Heat isn''t the only thing people feel in the Dallol Depression. Alarming earth tremors are frequently felt. There are also several active volcanoes
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Nechi Sar National Park

Nechi Sar National Park (Amharic for white grass) is located near Arba Minch town, named after the white grass that covers the undulating Nechi Sar plains, hosting the lakes Abaya and Chamo.

Nechi Sar National Park is in eastern Gamo Gofa Zone. The zonal capital, Arba Minch, is on the western border of the park. Arba Minch is 510 km south of the capital Addis Ababa and 279 km south-west of the regional capital Awassa. Nechi Sar is named after the white grass that covers the undulating Nechi Sar plains and contrasts with the black basalt rocks of the Amaro Mountains to the east, and the black soils of the plains.

This 750 km2 National Park was established in 1974, and it is among the most beautiful game reserves in Africa set in the Rift Valley at an altitude of 1,000-1650m, the Park protects not only the easterly Nech-Sar “white grass plains for which it is named, but also portions of lake Chamo and Abaya and the mountainous bridge of God” that lies between the two lakes. Nech-Sar National Park is the wide Varity of animals and 350 bird species have been recorded.

The most common large mammal here is Burchell’s Zebra, which is regularly seen in herds of two or more you should also see grant’s gazelle and, with a bit of luck, one of the 100 odd resident Swayne’s hartebeest. Lion, cheetah and even Africa world dog are present and Guenther’s dik-dik and greater Kudu, Crocodile, Hippo and Waterbuck are frequently seen from the view point over Lake Chamo. Acacia birds such as rollers, Sparrow weavers and Starlings are well represented, and Nech-Sar seems to be particularly good for Raptors

Around 15% of the park comprises portions of Lakes Abaya to the north and Chamo to the south. The water of Lake Abaya is always brown or red-brown, in contrast with Lake Chamo which has strikingly blue water and white sandy beaches. The park also covers the neck of land between the lakes which supports groundwater forest. At the foot of Mt Tabala in the south-east there are hot springs. The altitude ranges from 1,108m at the shore of Lake Chamo to 1,650m on Mt Kalia in the north-east.

The main habitats of Nechi Sar National Park are the lakes, their shorelines, the groundwater forest and connecting river, the dry grassy plains, thick bushland and the wooded valleys and foothills of the Amaro Mountains. Most of the park is covered in bush land, which is thick and impenetrable in places, the taller trees.

The forest between the two lakes and by the Kulfo River is dominated by Ficus sycamorus up to 30m tall. This same area supports a number of shrubs and scramblers, but few herbs on the forest floor. The freshwater swamps at the mouth of the Kulfo River and in Lake Chamo are dominated by Typha angustifolia, tall waterside grasses, e.g. Saccharum spontaneum, and the small leguminous trees, Sesbania sesban and the legume Aeschynomene elaphroxylon.